Hi, I'm Robert!
For my fellow teachers, I've constructed a model of teaching that I've summarized as the puncturing of space with pedagogical objects. . . The term "objects which puncture space" may help solidified one's sense of how pedagogy can be described within its new conceptual framework. Teachers who see the world in this manner should become more fully invested in the enterprise of teaching and learning.
Teaching Methematics
S.T.O.R.E.S.
for teachers
S.T.O.R.E.S.
for students
Handbook
The Euclid Project
Teacher's Manual
The Euclid Project
Student's Manual
An Introduction
to Geometer's Sketchpad
Teaching Mathematics
"Teaching Mathematics Puncturing Space: A Developing Pedagogical Tool" uses a diverse
body of research to clearly introduce important ideas related to learning. Theories from
the fields of neurology and cognitive development about how students obtain, synthesize
and retain information are examined and cohesively presented.

With an in-depth discussion of how educators compete with predictable outside stimuli
as well as with the internal life of the student mind, Dr. Mason explains the idea of
using a combination of objects as pedagogical tools to 'puncture' the learning space to
re-engage the student and to re-establish attentive behavior.

This readable book is valuable to educators in all fields not just to those teaching
Mathematics, and not just to those teaching in lower and secondary schools. Educators
will think carefully and differently about how information is delivered and processed
in the classroom, after reading this book.
S.T.O.R.E.S.
(for teachers)
Structured Teaching of Research and Experimentation
Skills (S.T.O.R.E.S.) science curriculum for elementary
school and middle school students is a process oriented
approach, focusing on classical principles of induction
and deduction, evidence gathering, and hypothesis
building, and empirical testing and refinement of
hypotheses that highlights scientific procedures.
S.T.O.R.E.S.
(for students)
Structured Teaching of Research and Experimentation
Skills (S.T.O.R.E.S.) science curriculum for elementary
school and middle school students is a process oriented
approach, focusing on classical principles of induction
and deduction, evidence gathering, and hypothesis
building, and empirical testing and refinement of
hypotheses that highlights scientific procedures.
Sketchpad Basics
Handbook
Sketchpad Basics Handbook is designed to introduce elementary school and middle school students
and teacher to Geometer’s Sketchpad. The Sketchpad, is a construction tablet on which one draws models of geometric shapes, transforms them, colors them, measures them, and animates them. The models invite students to explore, represent, solve problems, construct, discuss, investigate, describe, and predict. Implicit to these functions is the ability to build mathematical models of simple and complex ideas. The Sketchpad allows students to engage in “doing mathematics,” which is emphasized in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.

The investigations encourage students to work together in pairs and small groups, and to build on their knowledge by applying their knowledge to new information.

Sketchpad introduced through a series of explorations. All of the explorations are designed specifically to teach how to use the “tool box.” They represent technical exercises. That is, they teach how to use the drawing tools, and how to use the command menus to accomplish specific task. In some investigations students will replicate as set of instructions and then evaluate their findings. In other activities students are free to create their own investigation.
The Euclid Project
Teacher's Manual
The Euclid Project computer-based geometry program uses a scientific-experimentation approach to
providing middle school students with an intuitive un?derstanding of geometry as a precursor to the formal study of geometry later (e.g., in the 10th grade) and as a mediator for application of geometric understanding in a variety of contexts.

This scientific-experimentation approach to teaching geometry involves pre?senting the students with a mathematical hypothesis
(e.g., a line drawn across two sides of a triangle parallel to the third side divides the first two sides proportionally),
then having them use a “construction tablet” (Logo, Geometer Supposer, Geometer’s Sketchpad computer programs) to systematically
generate a series of cases to test the validity of the hypothesis (e.g., create a triangle and line parallel to a side,
then use animation to gener?ate a series of such triangles to see if the hypothesis holds for all of them).
The Euclid Project
Student's Manual
The Euclid Project computer-based geometry program uses a scientific-experimentation approach to
providing middle school students with an intuitive un?derstanding of geometry as a precursor to the formal study of geometry later (e.g., in the 10th grade) and as a mediator for application of geometric understanding in a variety of contexts.

This scientific-experimentation approach to teaching geometry involves pre?senting the students with a mathematical hypothesis
(e.g., a line drawn across two sides of a triangle parallel to the third side divides the first two sides proportionally),
then having them use a “construction tablet” (Logo, Geometer Supposer, Geometer’s Sketchpad computer programs) to systematically
generate a series of cases to test the validity of the hypothesis (e.g., create a triangle and line parallel to a side,
then use animation to gener?ate a series of such triangles to see if the hypothesis holds for all of them).
An Introduction to
Geometer's Sketchpad
This workbook is designed to introduce elementary school and middle school teachers to Geometer’s Sketchpad.

The Sketchpad, is a construction tablet on which one draws models of geometric shapes, transforms them, colors them, measures them, and animates them. The models invite students to explore, represent, solve problems, construct, discuss, investigate, describe, and predict.

Implicit to these functions is the ability to build mathematical models of simple and complex ideas.
The Sketchpad allows students to engage in “doing mathematics,” which is emphasized in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.

Modes of Approaching Math 3

page 3

       The third approach is often taken by students who are computationally competent and use mathematics as a tool.  These students enjoy constructing concrete solutions, such as determining the least number of tooth picks required to build a structure that would support a fifty-pound weight, or determining how to create a circle where each student is sitting on the lap of the student behind.  Students then search for the physical laws that explain the outcome by reading textbooks, and by talking with science and math teachers on the Internet. These students enjoy our philosophical discussions, but need the mathematics to be anchored in reality-based problems. 

            Through exploring different modes of teaching mathematics, I’ve come to realize the meaning of Alfred North Whitehead’s remark: “There is only one subject matter for education, and that is Life in all its manifestations.” The act of living is an act of making meaning, and of recognizing that people arrive at meaning in a variety of ways.  In teaching math, I strive to make students aware of the “manifestations” of life, people’s cultural, social, and intellectual similarities and differences as they create meaning and solve problems. In doing math constructively, student unlock their own intellectual potential, and learn to respect intellectual, artistic, and cultural differences. When education is designed around these larger issues, students will then appreciate the manifestations of life.

  • By Michael Sturm

    Robert Mason, affectionately known as Doc by both faculty and students, alike, has taught middle school math at Dalton for the last 20 years. ...

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  • Kenneth Offit

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  • Victoria Geduld

    Dr Robert E. Mason's Teaching Mathematics might seem far removed from productive pedagogical reading that would be assigned to an incoming Ph.D. teaching assistant in a History department. Indeed, this book should be mandatory for teachers in all disciplines at both the beginning and more advanced levels. ...